HOW SAN FRANCISCO BECAME THE ASSHOLE MAGNET OF THE WORLD

San Francisco is now entirely populated by:

– Assholes
– Douchebags
– Posers
– Hookers
– Elitist, Entitled, Trust Fund Dynastic Idiots
– Druggies
– Fat Politicians
– Snowflakes
– Eaters of $30.00 Hamburgers
– Rich Old Getty Seniors
– Corrupt Politicians
– Homeless Insane Attackers
and worse.

READ THE REPORT:  #3366ff;">SAN_FRANCISCO’S_CORRUPTION_CULTURE

San Francisco Building Single Public Toilet That Will Cost $1.7 Million

Heard it all before! Woke San Francisco Mayor London Breed AGAIN pledges to crack down on city’s rampant public drug taking – months after SHE opened city’s ‘drug market’

  • Mayor London Breed has announced a new crackdown on SF’s drug problem 
  • New tougher policies to be implemented by police and law enforcement
  • SF officials announced increase in arrests, seizures and felony charges 
  • Policies are departure from previous ‘soft touch’ approach and ‘drug markets’ 

San Francisco Mayor London Breed has signaled a U-turn in her approach to the city’s rampant drug taking when pledging ENDLESSLY to crackdown on the problem – this time by turning to the police.

Under Breed’s ‘soft touch’ policies that have included open-air drug markets where people can shoot up ‘without anyone going to jail’, San Francisco has seen a surge in open-air drugtaking, with nearly 1,700 fatal overdoses since the start of 2020.

San Francisco Building Single Public Toilet That Will Cost $1.7 Million

This time, Breed was joined by the top brass of San Francisco law enforcement as she again promised to get tough on drug dealing and ‘unacceptable’ public drug use at a Wednesday press conference at San Francisco police headquarters.

On the podium next to her was Police Chief William Scott and Breed-appointees District Attorney Brooke Jenkins, and District Six Supervisor Matt Dorsey, who are both fighting to keep their seats in upcoming November elections.

Breed appointed Jenkins after the previous district attorney, Chesa Boudin, was recalled in June for ‘not being tough enough on drug dealers’, and she appointed former police spokesperson Dorsey in May.

The officials were keen to emphasize an uptick in drug seizures in the long-suffering Tenderloin neighborhood, and drug arrests and felony narcotics charges across the city in the three months since Jenkins took charge.

San Francisco Mayor London Breed has once again declared she will crackdown on the city's rampant drug crisis

San Francisco Mayor London Breed has once again declared she will crackdown on the city’s rampant drug crisis

District Attorney Brooke Jenkins
Police Chief William Scott

Breed’s new approach involves working much closer with the police department (pictured right: Police Chief William Scott) and the DA’s office (pictured left: District Attorney Brooke Jenkins) to enforce tougher policies on drug dealers and drug users

A homeless man injects fentanyl into his friend's armpit, due to a lack of usable veins, as people walk by near City Hall on Saturday

A homeless man injects fentanyl into his friend’s armpit, due to a lack of usable veins, as people walk by near City Hall on Saturday

Drug-related incidents have been rampant in San Francisco in recent years, save for a predictable dip during the Coronavirus pandemic, with much of it blamed on old DA Chesa Boudin, who was recalled in June. The spike in July 2022 has been attributed to a federal grant the police department got to tackle drug crime in the Tenderloin neighborhood

Ghost-town San Francisco: Tech entrepreneur shares snaps of woke city’s deserted downtown on weekday morning and says she fears its finances will collapse, as it’s revealed just 39% of its workers have gone back to their offices 

Ghost-town San Francisco: Tech entrepreneur shares snaps of woke city's deserted downtown

Tech entrepreneur Michelle Tandler photographed her hometown of San Francisco this week, expressing concern over its desolate downtown. Earlier this month, security firm Kastle reviewed the situation and reported that San Francisco’s total downtown office occupancy sat at 39 percent in late September – one of the lowest amounts in the nation, despite mask mandates being lifted seven months ago. Prior to COVID-19, San Francisco’s office occupancy percentage was constantly at or near 100 percent, with many companies, especially tech firms, fighting for office space, the authors wrote. San Francisco’s office occupancy rate compares poorly to Austin, Texas, where 61 percent of workers are back; New York City, with 46 percent occupancy, and Los Angeles, with 45 percent. ‘I don’t think San Francisco government has fully grasped how problematic this is,’ Tandler said. ‘Either that, or they just don’t care. When these leases come up, companies are going to downsize or leave. These buildings rely on rent. The landlords pay $$ in taxes…’

Drug-related incidents have been rampant in San Francisco in recent years, save for a predictable dip during the Coronavirus pandemic, with much of it blamed on old DA Chesa Boudin, who was recalled in June. The spike in July 2022 has been attributed to a federal grant the police department got to tackle drug crime in the Tenderloin neighborhood

How San Francisco Uses Sex To Build It’s Culture

San Francisco promotes itself as an “anything goes” sexual lifestyle city.

Modern colleges sell the idea that putting your tongue or penis is someone else’s butt hole is ‘more exciting because it is more socially forbidden’. Kids from college swarm to San Francisco because they are told that they can get all kinds of sex and drugs there. Kinky people have three times as much sex as traditional people. So the horn-dogs move to San Francisco. Valleywag producer: Nicholas Denton, who openly loves young boys, spent a decade documenting Bay Area sluttery.

Alas, focusing your life on sex and drugs is not a great career choice. This has left San Francisco with one of the largest homeless populations of any major city. Thousands of douche-bag, wannabe, hipsters infest the alleys and facade-like neighborhoods of the City that was founded by prostitutes and gangsters.

Each of the Mayor’s of San Francisco, for decades, has had scandal-after-scandal with hookers, sleeping with aides wives, screwing Harvey Weinstein, having sex with convicted bribery perps and other shenanigans.

All of these kids want homes in SF but none of them can afford homes in SF. In offset, they create dorm-like flop-house dives to live-in, infect each other with AIDS, Monkeypox and scabies and fall by the way side.

She also mentioned how the city’s drug epidemic has touched her personally, as her younger sister died of a drug overdose at the age of 25.

Breed had made a made a strident speech last December declaring an official state of emergency in the Tenderloin and promising to crackdown on the ‘bulls*** destroying the city.’

But the intervening ten months have seen policies brought in which have included trialing the infamous taxpayer-funded ‘open-air drug markets’, which were shuttered in June.

Other soft-touch policies have included electronically-tagging users and having police officers track them down and confiscate their drugs if they wander into known drug-dealing areas.

When she was asked what would be different under the new policies compared to last December, Breed pointed to an increase in enforcement, including boosting the police budget and hiring a further 200 officers.

She also said that the city has expanded the number of treatment beds by hundreds on top of the 2,200 already available, and highlighted expanded alternative response teams and safety ambassadors.

The mayor and law enforcement also promised to come down harder on not just drug dealers but also drug users who refuse to accept public services to help them. The criminal justice system will also provide treatment options, they added.

A homeless woman smokes crack with two others in the Tenderloin on Friday

A homeless woman smokes crack with two others in the Tenderloin on Friday

A homeless woman smokes crack in the Tenderloin District of San Francisco

A homeless woman smokes crack in the Tenderloin District of San Francisco

Homeless drug addicts smoke fentanyl on the street near City Hall on Friday

Homeless drug addicts smoke fentanyl on the street near City Hall on Friday

A homeless drug addict holds pieces of fentanyl near City Hall in in the Tenderloin District of San Francisco

A homeless drug addict holds pieces of fentanyl near City Hall in in the Tenderloin District of San Francisco

‘We need to firmly establish what is acceptable conduct on our streets and in our public spaces,’ Breed said.

‘San Francisco has to draw a firm line at behaviors that harm, that injure and cost neighborhoods peace of mind, everyday safety and quality of life.’

The city must be more aggressive with enforcement against drug dealing and violence, she said.

‘Selling drugs is not legal,’ she continued. ‘Using drugs out in the open is completely unacceptable. So, yes, public health is a part of this enforcement effort, but we have to be moving together in the same direction.’

The police chief showed that arrests for drug sales and possession increased 72 per cent from July to September compared with the same period last, with a total of 266 compared with 163. In Tenderloin the seizure rate more than doubled.

Jenkins was formerly a prosecutor under her recalled boss Boudin but quit last year and has now replaced her. She has announced a range of new hardline policies that diverge from her old boss, whom she slammed for not being tough enough on drug dealers.

The new DA has a similar charging rate to Boudin, at 62 per cent, but she said the difference has been that has charged 85 per cent of felony felony narcotics cases, nearly double the rate under Boudin.

Jenkins also pulled back more than 30 plea offers for alleged fentanyl dealers under Boudin and she has also introduced the possibility of murder charges for dealers who sell drugs that result in lethal overdoses.

Dealers could selling near schools would also face harsher punishment.

A homeless man injects fentanyl into his arm in the Tenderloin District of San Francisco

A homeless man injects fentanyl into his arm in the Tenderloin District of San Francisco

Homeless drug addicts take over a city bus stop in front of the Asian Art Museum as people who are waiting for the bus wait in the background in the Tenderloin District of San Francisco

Homeless drug addicts take over a city bus stop in front of the Asian Art Museum as people who are waiting for the bus wait in the background in the Tenderloin District of San Francisco

A homeless drug addict shows bruises and scars on his swollen legs from drug use in the Tenderloin District of San Francisco

A homeless drug addict shows bruises and scars on his swollen legs from drug use in the Tenderloin District of San Francisco

A homeless drug addict injects fentanyl into his arm near City Hall on Friday

A homeless drug addict injects fentanyl into his arm near City Hall on Friday

London Breed’s tragic younger sister

London Breed’s younger sister died of a drug overdose in San Francisco in 2006.

The tragedy happened the day before she turned 26.

‘I lost a sister to a drug overdose. No, it was not fentanyl, but I did lose a sister in this city,’ an emotional Breed said.

‘She was my younger sister.’

Her brother is also serving a 44-year prison sentence for manslaughter and armed robbery in 2000.

Boudin’s practice of sending dealers caught with up to 100 grams of fentanyl to the services-focused Community Justice Center has been stopped and users of the Center with at least five citations will have their charges added up.

Overall, the promise of a firmer hand and more carrot than stick is likely to be welcome news to San Franciscans who are fed up with crime and harassment.

But critics such as Public Defender Mano Raju have accused Jenkins and Breed of returning to the failed ‘war on drugs’, which did not reduce overdose deaths.

Raju said in a statement that the ‘heavy focus on relying on police and prosecutions to arrest and cage our way out of a public health crisis remains in direct conflict with decades of social and scientific data which indicates otherwise.’

Scott said that officers would still take a ‘harm reduction’ approach first with users. But he said that ‘we can’t just arrest dealers and then leave the people who are buying drugs alone to do as they please and think this is going to get better.’

‘That doesn’t mean that people who are addicted get a free pass,’ he said. ‘Our job is to take away all of the excuses about why they can’t and won’t seek help, and then when they don’t, that’s when enforcement comes into play.’

Civil rights attorney Joe Alioto Veronese, one of Jenkin’s opponents in the upcoming election, called the press conference a political stunt.

Veronese told The San Francisco Chronicle the mayor ‘paraded her two candidates’ right before ballots are sent out ‘on an issue that is very important to San Francisco and that she’s frankly failing San Francisco on.’

The infiltration of fentanyl to the US narcotics market in the mid-to-late 2010s saw a spike in accidental drug overdose deaths.

The opioid, which is manufactured synthetically and added to other drugs, can be 50 times stronger than heroin. Just 2mg can be deadly.

Down the drain! Dem-led San Francisco is slammed for plans to build ONE public toilet for $1.7 million in upmarket neighborhood – that won’t even open until 2025

  • Assemblyman Matt Haney has been planning for nearly a year to build a single communal toilet for $1.7 million in the Noe Valley Town Square 
  • But on Wednesday, Haney temporarily suspendeded plans to build the single commode after the eye-watering price-tag was met with outrage
  • Residents have long complained about worsening potholes that the city has failed to fix, and streets overrun with homeless people 
  • Some have also complained that they are too scared to walk down the streets without a baseball bat as crime continues to spiral out of control 
  • The $1.7 million public toilet project is already in the state budget, but now Haney is figuring out how to spend less money on the construction  

 

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A San Francisco lawmaker has been slammed for flushing money down the drain after being awarded $1.7 million for a single public toilet in a charming town square in the crime ridden, Dem-led city.

Assemblyman Matt Haney has been planning for nearly a year to build a single communal toilet in the Noe Valley Town Square in a 150 square foot space after city officials said there was not enough funding to build a restroom when the square was constructed in 2016.

But on Wednesday, Haney temporarily suspendeded plans to build the single commode after the eye-watering price-tag was met with outrage when it was revealed by the San Francisco Chronicle.

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Haney secured the funding from the Recreation and Parks Department, not questioning the price tag which is nearly as high as what a single-family home in the area costs.

‘They told me $1.7 million, and I got $1.7 million,’ he told the San Francisco Chronicle  at the time.

‘I didn’t have the option of bringing home less of the bacon when it comes to building a toilet. A half a toilet or a toilet-maybe-someday is not much use to anyone.’

The plan for the single commode in the city were met with outrage. Residents have long complained about worsening potholes that the city has failed to fix. The city’s streets are also overrun with homeless people who have turned parts of it into an open-air drug market, with some residents claiming they are too scared to walk down the streets without a baseball bat as crime continues to spiral out of control.

Officials halted plans to build a communal toilet in Noe Valley Town Square after discovering it would cost $1.7 million and take two years to open

Officials halted plans to build a communal toilet in Noe Valley Town Square after discovering it would cost $1.7 million and take two years to open

Haney has planned to build the toilet for nearly a year, but didn't realize the cost and two-year timeline until he read a local news report

Haney has planned to build the toilet for nearly a year, but didn’t realize the cost and two-year timeline until he read a local news report

The toilet is supposed to go in the Noe Valley Town Square park that was built in 2016

The toilet is supposed to go in the Noe Valley Town Square park that was built in 2016

Haney did an about-turn on the plans later on Wednesday and canceled a glittering press conference in the neighborhood, where the average price of a home is $2 million, saying that when he first heard the cost of the projected ‘it sounded shockingly high to me.’

He then temporarily put a hold on the plans, telling the publication: ‘Noe Valley will at some point get a bathroom, but it shouldn’t cost this much and it shouldn’t take this long, and I’m angry about it.’

California has the highest income tax rate in the nation at 13.3 percent, with San Francisco among the most expensive cities to live in.

Nearly two thirds of residents said their city is going downhill because of the widespread homelessness, crime and rising housing costs, according to a new poll.

The golden city has dealt with an increase in human feces on the streets since 2011 as the homeless population has grown rampant in the city.

While city officials might be attempting to halt these issues with pricy solutions, it appears as if some residents aren’t onboard with how to clean up the city.

Despite the shocking price, the $1.7 million in the state budget is already committed to the Noe Valley toilet. However, Haney said he does want to find a way to spend less on the project.

‘The cost is insane,’ Haney said. ‘ The process is insane. The amount of time it takes is insane.

San Francisco Recreation and Park officials said they are working to lower the price of the single toilet – but the costs of construction have raised about 30 percent over the past few years.

‘It’s also important to note that public projects and their overall cost estimates don’t just reflect the price of the erecting structures,’ a spokesperson told Fox News. ‘They include the cost of planning, drawing, permits, reviews, public outreach and construction management.’

Rec and Park officials also told KTLA75 that future improvements and maintenance of the toilet can lead to the pricy million-dollar price tag.

Some were shocked at the city’s plans to unknowingly waste taxpayer dollars by building a million-dollar single toilet.

‘State legislators should have never approved that $1.7 million,’ one person wrote on Twitter.

Another added: ‘Somebody hidden in the background is getting very, very rich on taxpayer money.’

‘We need to vote on what percentage of our taxes go to what and then the government has to spend it that way,’ another person said. ‘We pay so many taxes and now fees for government employees to make $100k a year by deciding what to spend taxes on. This system isn’t working.’

A parody accounting posing as the infamous million-dollar town square toilet, dubbed @noevalleytoilet, has gained traction by poking at the decision to halt the construction plans.

‘I promise I’ll be worth every penny. You just gotta give me a chance!’

Meanwhile, San Francisco’s human feces problem has been climbing since 2011 with more waste being found on the streets, according to Business Insider. 

The growing issue led to Mayor London Breed addressing the concern and a new public health initiative in December 2021.

‘The challenges, the cramped conditions, the nasty streets, and when I say nasty – full of feces and urine – that the Department of Public Works is cleaning every single day, but it comes back just a few hours later,’ Breed previously said.

The impact of the initiative is unclear.

Mayor London Breed addressing the concern and a new public health initiative in December 2021 to help address the amount of human feces on the streets - but the impact is unclear

Mayor London Breed addressing the concern and a new public health initiative in December 2021 to help address the amount of human feces on the streets – but the impact is unclear

Above, homeless tents in San Francisco earlier this summer

Above, homeless tents in San Francisco earlier this summer

The number of homeless people in San Francisco was counted in February at almost 8,000, the second highest number of any year since 2005 according to the count which takes place every three years

The number of homeless people in San Francisco was counted in February at almost 8,000, the second highest number of any year since 2005 according to the count which takes place every three years

Pictured: Homeless people setting up their few belonging near San Francisco City hall in August

Pictured: Homeless people setting up their few belonging near San Francisco City hall in August

California has the highest income tax rate in the nation at 13.3 percent, with San Francisco among the most expensive cities to live in.

Nearly two thirds of residents said their city is going downhill because of the widespread homelessness, crime and rising housing costs, according to a new poll.

A survey of 1,653 adults found that 65 percent said the city was declining, while 37 percent said they would live elsewhere in three years. A staggering 84 percent of people aged 65 and over said they are planning to leave.

Homelessness in the city is rampant and was tallied in February at almost 8,000, the second highest number of any year since 2005.

Funding to combat the homelessness crisis is constantly being thrown at city officials with the recent being $117 million in funding from the California Department of Housing and Community Development to build 290 affordable housing units by 2023.

However, as officials attempt to clean up the streets, some say the efforts are too extreme after a lawsuit filed in September alleged the city was violating the rights of homeless individuals by throwing away their belongings that are on the streets.

‘Instead of focusing on criminalization policies that don’t work, that are terrorizing unhoused people which is unconstitutional. The city needs to focus on what the actual problem is here which is that it’s too expensive for people who grew up and have been longtime residents of San Francisco to actually live here and survive,’ attorney Zal Shroff told ABC7.

Shelters in the city are also often not used by some homeless in the city as they can prohibit animals and the use of drugs.

A homeless drug addict injects fentanyl into his arm near City Hall on September 2

A homeless drug addict injects fentanyl into his arm near City Hall on September 2

A homeless woman smokes crack with two others in the Tenderloin on September 2

A homeless woman smokes crack with two others in the Tenderloin on September 2

The woke city is known for its open-air drug markets that allow for dealers to sell without the fear of being arrested.  Under Mayor Breed’s ‘soft touch’ drug policies, open-air drugtaking has surged with nearly 1,700 fatal overdoses since 2020.

Residents are arming themselves with baseball bats and stun guns as Breed recently opened a new drug sobering facility in the SoMa neighborhood in northeast San Francisco.

The facility, which opened in June, has drawn in violent druggies in the one peaceful neighborhood. The sobering facility was characterized as a safe haven for addicts looking to get back on their feet.

But SoMa resident and business owner Mark Sackett said things were not playing out nearly as the city intended.

‘They’re letting their clients come out here and get high, go inside and get sober and then get high again,’ Sackett told ABC7.

The center has been allocated at least $4.2million from taxpayers for 2022 and 2023, according to ABC7.

Breed recently signaled a U-turn in her approach to the rampant drug problem and pledged to crackdown on the issue by turning to police.

The mayor was joined for a press conference earlier this month by the top brass of San Francisco law enforcement as she again promised to get tough on drug dealing and ‘unacceptable’ public drug use.

She had made a made a strident speech last December declaring an official state of emergency in the Tenderloin and promising to crackdown on the ‘bulls*** destroying the city.’

But the intervening ten months have seen policies brought in which have included trialing the infamous taxpayer-funded ‘open-air drug markets’, which were shuttered in June.

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